Natural Health & Wellness

Natural Remedies for Problems in Breastfeeding – Part 2

breastfeedingNatural Remedies for Problems in Breastfeeding – Part 2
by Susun S Weed

With the resurgence of interest in breastfeeding, there is increasing demand for natural remedies for the minor problems that accompany nursing. These remedies, taken from my book Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year, offer simple, safe ways for nursing women and their infants to counter problems and stay healthy. This information has been collected from wise women, old wives, and granny midwives. May you benefit from their wisdom.

Part one of this article reviewed ways to increase your milk flow and your milk quality by ingesting herbal infusions, tinctures, seeds, and foods rich in carotenes. Part two of this article shows you numerous simple and safe ways to allay sore breasts, infections, engorgements, and sore nipples due to breastfeeding.

PAINFUL BREASTS, ENGORGEMENT, SORE NIPPLES

Painful, sore breasts and nipples are one of the most common problems encountered during lactation. Virtually every nursing mom will need help on this account at least once. Sore breasts and nipples can prevent nursing, lead to a decrease in milk production, and interfere with the bonding between infant and mother.

There are three main causes of painful breasts.

1. Engorgement:
An oversupply of milk engorges the breast tissues, causing tenderness and pain. There is no fever and the breasts are not lumpy. Engorgement may occur as a result of a decision not to milk, when milk comes in very quickly, when mother and child are separated for an extended time, or during weaning.

Remedy A very strong tea of sage is a classic remedy for stopping the flow of milk. It is taken sip by sip, up to three cups a day.

2. A blocked milk tube or duct:
This causes swelling of the breast and acute pain. The blocked duct may feel lumpy and bruised, and a red streak may radiate out from it. Cessation of nursing can increase the discomfort and endanger the milk supply. Nursing should be continued, but carefully, nursing and pumping just enough to empty the breast.

Remedy Right before nursing, use a warm compress for 5 – 10 minutes (see following). They all taste fine to baby, so no need to wash your breast before offering it.

3. Mastitis (infection in the breast):

Causes swelling and pain, accompanied by acute tenderness and redness of the breast. The infected breast may be hard, lumpy and swollen. There may be fever as well. This condition is the most dangerous of the three. If not treated promptly, the infection can cause scarring of the ducts and prevent nursing a later child.

REMEDIES FOR MASTITIS

Use hot compresses or soaks at least four times daily. Get plenty of bed rest. Breast infections are almost always a sign of too little rest. Regular naps or rest breaks are important too.

Nurse as often and as long as possible on the infected breast. A breast infection will not make the infant sick.

Propolis is collected and used by bees as glue. It has a history of use against infection in Russia and a strong following among midwives in North America. It is said to accelerate healing time by increasing the body’s metabolism and general resistance to disease. A dose of the tincture is 10 to 15 drops twice a day.

Echinacea root tincture is an excellent ally for any woman with mastitis. I use one-half drop per pound of body weight as a single dose. (For a woman who weighs 130 pounds, the dose is 65 drops or two dropperfuls.) The dose is repeated as often as twelve times a day until symptoms remiss. I continue taking Echinacea for at least a week after all symptoms have cleared.

Poke root (Phytolacca americana) tincture stimulates lymph gland activity and clears mastitis quickly. Poke root is potent and potentially toxic; the effect is cumulative. Use no more than two drops of the tincture daily. I combine poke with Echinacea for acute and severe infections.

POULTICES AND SOAKS FOR SORE BREASTS

Poultices, compresses and soaks are the best first aid for painful breasts. A poultice consists of fresh or cooked herbs placed directly on the breasts. A compress is prepared by soaking a cloth and applying that. And a soak is just that: – a soak in hot water.

Hot water alone has beneficial effects for women dealing with sore breasts, no matter what the cause. Hot water stimulates circulation and eases the tension in taut, swollen, breast tissues. Herbs infused in the water used to compress or soak increase the effectiveness.

When applying these external remedies, remember that frequent, consistent, short applications work better than sporadic, lengthy treatments. That is, six or seven treatments of five minutes each spread over the day will be more effective than one treatment lasting for thirty minutes. If infection is present, discard any plant material and wash the poultice materials after each use so as to prevent the spread of the infection.

Soak the breasts in a sink full of warm water. Fill the sink, lean over, and immerse one or both breasts. You can massage the milk out while soaking to further relieve engorgement and ease pain.

Place a handful of fresh or dried parsley leaves in a clean cotton diaper and tie it closed with a rubber band. Put in a pan of water and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes. Apply the hot (fresh) parsley as a poultice or use the (dried) herb still tied in the diaper as a compress to ease swollen and painful breasts.

Prepare fresh or dried comfrey leaves the same way as parsley. A hot compress or poultice of comfrey leaves soothes sore nipples, softens engorged tissues, reduces the pain of swollen breasts, and helps unblock tubes and ducts. It is generally considered safe to use comfrey root preparations externally, but nursing mothers may be understandably leery to use them for fear of injuring her infant’s liver.

A cold poultice of grated raw potato can draw out the heat of inflammation, localize infection and unblock clogged tubes. Grated raw potato is applied directly to the breasts, and covered with a clean cloth. When dry, it is removed and replaced with fresh grated potato.

Marshmallow roots make wonderful soaks that soothe tender tissues and sore nipples, open clogged ducts and tubes, powerfully draw out infection, and diminish the pain of engorged, inflamed breasts. Steep two ounces of dried marshmallow root overnight in half a gallon of water just off the boil. The texture of the finished brew should be slippery and slimy. Heat as needed, pouring the hot liquid into a sink or basin and soak your sore and aching breasts.

Infused herbal oils – such as those made from the flowers of calendula, elder, or dandelion, or from the roots of yellow dock – can ease the pain of tender breasts and sore nipples. Buy them ready-made. Or make them yourself: Gently warm a handful of dried or fresh blossoms in just enough olive oil to cover; keep warm for 20 minutes. Strain, cool, and rub into nipples and breasts whenever there is pain or sensitivity.

PREVENTING SORE NIPPLES

Sore nipples heal rapidly, often within a day or two, but it is still easier to prevent them than to heal them. Nipple sprays intended to prevent sore nipples have been shown to be ineffective, but the following Wise Woman remedies are safe and effective. Note: Persistently or suddenly sore nipples may indicate a thrush infection. Further symptoms of thrush include pink, flaky skin and itchy nipples.

~ Continue to nurse. Neither sore nipples nor thrush are helped by discontinuing nursing; in fact, they may be remedied by more frequent nursing.

~ Expose the nipples and breasts to the air as much as possible to discourage the growth of thrush. Avoid wearing a bra 24 hours a day. Wear nursing bras with the flaps down whenever possible.

~ Expose the nipples and breasts to sunlight for brief periods to strengthen tissues. Increase gradually from thirty seconds in the sun to a maximum of three minutes.

~ Olive oil, sweet almond oil, lanolin, or comfrey ointment rubbed into the nipples throughout the latter part of the pregnancy and the beginning weeks of nursing create healthy, flexible tissues very resistant to cracks, tears, and chapping.

~ Experiment with different nursing positions until you find those in which you are completely comfortable, with the entire areola (dark area) in the baby’s mouth, nipple centered.

~ Offer your breast often. Reducing the number of feedings can make the baby so hungry that it tears at the breast.

~ Avoid soap, cologne, deodorant and powder on your nipples or breasts. Do not wash nipples with soap. Soap predisposes the nipples to chapping and cracking.

REMEDIES FOR SORE NIPPLES

~ Crushed ice wrapped in a wet cloth, or a frozen gauze pad, applied to the nipples immediately before nursing is a good local pain killer. This cold treatment also helps bring out soft or small nipples and helps baby feed more easily when the breasts are very full.

~ Comfrey ointment softens and strengthens nipples at the same time. It is exceptionally soothing to sensitive nipples and rapidly heals any fissures or bruises.

~ Yarrow leaf poultices – or yarrow infused oil – provide almost instantaneous pain relief and heal cracked nipples rapidly.

~ Any of the poultices described for painful breasts may be used advantageously. Comfrey and marshmallow are especially effective. Many brief poultices work better than one or two lengthy sessions.
~
The gel from a fresh aloe vera leaf will soothe and heal sore and cracked nipples.

~ Calendula ointment is an old favorite to heal and strengthen nipples. CAUTION: Ointments containing antibiotics, steroids and anesthetic (painkilling) drugs are potentially harmful to both mother and infant.
REFERENCES AND RESOURCES

The Complete Book of Breastfeeding, Sally Olds and Marvin Eiger; 1972 Bantam Books
Nursing Your Baby, Karen Pryor; 1973, Simon and Schuster
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, La Leche League, 1963.
Breastfeeding Basics, Cecelia Worth; 1983 McGraw Hill
La Leche League, 9616 Minneapolis Ave., Franklin Park, IL 60131
Aftercare: Sharon Hamilton; Babies Grow on Milk and Kisses; Arny Galblum Booklets available from Emma Goldman Clinic for Women, 715 Dodge Street, Iowa Cily, IA 52240
The Way of Herbs, Michael Tierra; Unity Press

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR PROBLEMS IN BREASTFEEDING by Susun S Weed

breast-feedingNatural Remedies for problems with breastfeeding

PART 2

by Susun S Weed

With the resurgence of interest in breastfeeding, there is increasing demand for natural remedies for the minor problems that accompany nursing. These remedies, taken from my book Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year, offer simple, safe ways for nursing women and their infants to counter problems and stay healthy. This information has been collected from wise women, old wives, and granny midwives. May you benefit from their wisdom.
Part one of this article reviewed ways to increase your milk flow and your milk quality by ingesting herbal infusions, tinctures, seeds, and foods rich in carotenes. Part two of this article shows you numerous simple and safe ways to allay sore breasts, infections, engorgements, and sore nipples due to breastfeeding.

 

PAINFUL BREASTS, ENGORGEMENT, SORE NIPPLES
Painful, sore breasts and nipples are one of the most common problems encountered during lactation. Virtually every nursing mom will need help on this account at least once. Sore breasts and nipples can prevent nursing, lead to a decrease in milk production, and interfere with the bonding between infant and mother.
There are three main causes of painful breasts.

1. Engorgement:
 An oversupply of milk engorges the breast tissues, causing tenderness and pain. There is no fever and the breasts are not lumpy. Engorgement may occur as a result of a decision not to milk, when milk comes in very quickly, when mother and child are separated for an extended time, or during weaning.
Remedy A very strong tea of sage is a classic remedy for stopping the flow of milk. It is taken sip by sip, up to three cups a day.

2. A blocked milk tube or duct:
This causes swelling of the breast and acute pain. The blocked duct may feel lumpy and bruised, and a red streak may radiate out from it. Cessation of nursing can increase the discomfort and endanger the milk supply. Nursing should be continued, but carefully, nursing and pumping just enough to empty the breast.
Remedy Right before nursing, use a warm compress for 5 – 10 minutes (see following). They all taste fine to baby, so no need to wash your breast before offering it.

3. Mastitis (infection in the breast):
Causes swelling and pain, accompanied by acute tenderness and redness of the breast. The infected breast may be hard, lumpy and swollen. There may be fever as well. This condition is the most dangerous of the three. If not treated promptly, the infection can cause scarring of the ducts and prevent nursing a later child.

REMEDIES FOR MASTITIS

Use hot compresses or soaks at least four times daily. Get plenty of bed rest. Breast infections are almost always a sign of too little rest. Regular naps or rest breaks are important too.
Nurse as often and as long as possible on the infected breast. A breast infection will not make the infant sick.
Propolis is collected and used by bees as glue. It has a history of use against infection in Russia and a strong following among midwives in North America. It is said to accelerate healing time by increasing the body’s metabolism and general resistance to disease. A dose of the tincture is 10 to 15 drops twice a day.
Echinacea root tincture is an excellent ally for any woman with mastitis. I use one-half drop per pound of body weight as a single dose. (For a woman who weighs 130 pounds, the dose is 65 drops or two dropperfuls.) The dose is repeated as often as twelve times a day until symptoms remiss. I continue taking Echinacea for at least a week after all symptoms have cleared.
Poke root (Phytolacca americana) tincture stimulates lymph gland activity and clears mastitis quickly. Poke root is potent and potentially toxic; the effect is cumulative. Use no more than two drops of the tincture daily. I combine poke with Echinacea for acute and severe infections.

POULTICES AND SOAKS FOR SORE BREASTS

Poultices, compresses and soaks are the best first aid for painful breasts. A poultice consists of fresh or cooked herbs placed directly on the breasts. A compress is prepared by soaking a cloth and applying that. And a soak is just that: – a soak in hot water.
Hot water alone has beneficial effects for women dealing with sore breasts, no matter what the cause. Hot water stimulates circulation and eases the tension in taut, swollen, breast tissues. Herbs infused in the water used to compress or soak increase the effectiveness.

When applying these external remedies, remember that frequent, consistent, short applications work better than sporadic, lengthy treatments. That is, six or seven treatments of five minutes each spread over the day will be more effective than one treatment lasting for thirty minutes. If infection is present, discard any plant material and wash the poultice materials after each use so as to prevent the spread of the infection.

Soak the breasts in a sink full of warm water. Fill the sink, lean over, and immerse one or both breasts. You can massage the milk out while soaking to further relieve engorgement and ease pain.

Place a handful of fresh or dried parsley leaves in a clean cotton diaper and tie it closed with a rubber band. Put in a pan of water and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes. Apply the hot (fresh) parsley as a poultice or use the (dried) herb still tied in the diaper as a compress to ease swollen and painful breasts.

Prepare fresh or dried comfrey leaves the same way as parsley. A hot compress or poultice of comfrey leaves soothes sore nipples, softens engorged tissues, reduces the pain of swollen breasts, and helps unblock tubes and ducts. It is generally considered safe to use comfrey root preparations externally, but nursing mothers may be understandably leery to use them for fear of injuring her infant’s liver.

A cold poultice of grated raw potato can draw out the heat of inflammation, localize infection and unblock clogged tubes. Grated raw potato is applied directly to the breasts, and covered with a clean cloth. When dry, it is removed and replaced with fresh grated potato.

Marshmallow roots make wonderful soaks that soothe tender tissues and sore nipples, open clogged ducts and tubes, powerfully draw out infection, and diminish the pain of engorged, inflamed breasts. Steep two ounces of dried marshmallow root overnight in half a gallon of water just off the boil. The texture of the finished brew should be slippery and slimy. Heat as needed, pouring the hot liquid into a sink or basin and soak your sore and aching breasts.

Infused herbal oils – such as those made from the flowers of calendula, elder, or dandelion, or from the roots of yellow dock – can ease the pain of tender breasts and sore nipples. Buy them ready-made. Or make them yourself: Gently warm a handful of dried or fresh blossoms in just enough olive oil to cover; keep warm for 20 minutes. Strain, cool, and rub into nipples and breasts whenever there is pain or sensitivity.

PREVENTING SORE NIPPLES

Sore nipples heal rapidly, often within a day or two, but it is still easier to prevent them than to heal them. Nipple sprays intended to prevent sore nipples have been shown to be ineffective, but the following Wise Woman remedies are safe and effective. Note: Persistently or suddenly sore nipples may indicate a thrush infection. Further symptoms of thrush include pink, flaky skin and itchy nipples.√

~ Continue to nurse. Neither sore nipples nor thrush are helped by discontinuing nursing; in fact, they may be remedied by more frequent nursing.

~ Expose the nipples and breasts to the air as much as possible to discourage the growth of thrush. Avoid wearing a bra 24 hours a day. Wear nursing bras with the flaps down whenever possible.

~ Expose the nipples and breasts to sunlight for brief periods to strengthen tissues. Increase gradually from thirty seconds in the sun to a maximum of three minutes.

~ Olive oil, sweet almond oil, lanolin, or comfrey ointment rubbed into the nipples throughout the latter part of the pregnancy and the beginning weeks of nursing create healthy, flexible tissues very resistant to cracks, tears, and chapping.

~ Experiment with different nursing positions until you find those in which you are completely comfortable, with the entire areola (dark area) in the baby’s mouth, nipple centered.

~ Offer your breast often. Reducing the number of feedings can make the baby so hungry that it tears at the breast.

~ Avoid soap, cologne, deodorant and powder on your nipples or breasts. Do not wash nipples with soap. Soap predisposes the nipples to chapping and cracking.

REMEDIES FOR SORE NIPPLES

~ Crushed ice wrapped in a wet cloth, or a frozen gauze pad, applied to the nipples immediately before nursing is a good local pain killer. This cold treatment also helps bring out soft or small nipples and helps baby feed more easily when the breasts are very full.

~ Comfrey ointment softens and strengthens nipples at the same time. It is exceptionally soothing to sensitive nipples and rapidly heals any fissures or bruises.

~ Yarrow leaf poultices – or yarrow infused oil – provide almost instantaneous pain relief and heal cracked nipples rapidly.

~ Any of the poultices described for painful breasts may be used advantageously. Comfrey and marshmallow are especially effective. Many brief poultices work better than one or two lengthy sessions.
~ 
The gel from a fresh aloe vera leaf will soothe and heal sore and cracked nipples.

~ Calendula ointment is an old favorite to heal and strengthen nipples. CAUTION: Ointments containing antibiotics, steroids and anesthetic (painkilling) drugs are potentially harmful to both mother and infant.


REFERENCES AND RESOURCES

The Complete Book of Breastfeeding, Sally Olds and Marvin Eiger; 1972 Bantam Books
Nursing Your Baby, Karen Pryor; 1973, Simon and Schuster
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, La Leche League, 1963.
Breastfeeding Basics, Cecelia Worth; 1983 McGraw Hill
La Leche League, 9616 Minneapolis Ave., Franklin Park, IL 60131
Aftercare: Sharon Hamilton; Babies Grow on Milk and Kisses; Arny Galblum Booklets available from Emma Goldman Clinic for Women, 715 Dodge Street, Iowa Cily, IA 52240
The Way of Herbs, Michael Tierra; Unity Press

Early Development and Food Imprinting for Longterm Health by Karen Ranzi, M.A.

pregnant Early Development and Food Imprinting for Longterm Health

by Karen Ranzi, M.A.

The food a pregnant woman consumes will lay down the health and genetic code for her child for the rest of his or her life. What the mother eats and how she feels about herself, her emotional life, affects every aspect of the childʼs development.
Breastfeeding follows Natureʼs plan for childrenʼs development. Human milk is perfect for the human babyʼs digestive system, just as cow milk is perfect for the calf, and goat milk is perfect for the kid goatʼs digestion. When animals suckle the milk of their own species, more energy is available for development of the offspringʼs body and brain.
From a 2007 study, the journal Pediatrics reports the importance of the mother eating plentiful amounts of fruits and veggies while breastfeeding, as “Then baby will probably like them.” This study was designed to test the influence of early sensory experiences on the development of healthy eating patterns.

Flavors from the motherʼs diet are transmitted through amniotic fluid and motherʼs milk. Therefore, a baby learns the tastes of specific foods when mother consumes those foods on a regular basis. If babies like the tastes of a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, then we get them off to an early start of lifelong healthy eating habits.
Another article in Science Daily December 2010 reveals “a motherʼs own eating habits, and whether she views her child as a picky eater, has a huge impact on whether the child consumes enough fruits and vegetables. What and how mothers eat is the most direct influence on what toddlers eat.”

It is fundamental that the infant receive mainly motherʼs milk for most of the first year of life. The child should not be given solid food to chew until equipped with many teeth.
When starting solid foods the mother should introduce a food similar to the protein in motherʼs milk….fresh, ripe, organic fruit such as ripe banana. Children who begin eating before theyʼre ready often develop allergies.
Victoria Boutenko, in her article “The Imprinting of Eating Habits” writes: “Lifelong food preferences start to develop while a baby is still in the womb. The strongest pattern for future food preferences is formed during the ages of 9 to 18 months. At this time, everything connected with food intake leaves a strong imprint on the childʼs brain.”

Diets low in fruits and vegetables at young ages pose increased risks for chronic diseases later in life.
We know smoking, alcohol, and caffeine are harmful to the human body but are we aware that diets high in cooked food, animal flesh and products, especially dairy, wheat and other glutinous grains, and processed and refined foods can all cause problems for us?
A healthy diet, loaded in nutrient density from fresh plant foods, can replenish, hydrate and nourish the entire body and skin from the inside out. The raw food lifestyle truly does create beauty from within.

Women and their relationship to food and their body are very powerful, greatly impacting the unborn child and the children in their life.
Those who significantly increase the healthful organic fresh plant foods in their lifestyle will see positive changes in their energy, mental clarity, and overall immunity. Research has shown that 50% of the protein and 70 to 90% of the vitamins and minerals are destroyed when food is heated. When food is heated above 115 degrees Fahrenheit, many of the vitamins, minerals, and amino acids begin to break down. You may be consuming many calories but they are essentially “empty” calories as you arenʼt getting the nutrients your body needs to function properly.
Some people feel hungry after a big meal because they didnʼt receive the necessary nutrients the body is craving.

In October 2011 in the journal Cell, it was reported that “green vegetables, from bok choy to broccoli, are the source of a chemical signal that is important to a fully functioning immune system. They do this by ensuring that immune cells in the gut and the skin known as intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) function properly.”
And finally and most crucial, the human body requires high water content food as our body is 72% water from our blood and cellular tissues, and the water content needs to be continually replaced. Cooked and processed foods and animal products are depleted of water content. Only fresh uncooked fruits and vegetables provide the necessary water we need.
Are you ready to increase the fresh plant nutrients in your family diet for longevity and vibrant health?

Copyright 2012 Karen Ranzi
Karen Ranzi, author of Creating Healthy Children, motivational speaker, raw/living food
coach can be reached at karen@superhealthychildren.com or (201) 934-6778.
www.superhealthychildren.com

Cures without side effects by Max Corradi

cures-bookCures without side effects

by Max Corradi

Practical healing manual of the most essential and effective biotherapy treatments

Book excerpt

This book is a practical and very condensed health guide. It’s an essential manual for those who want to cure themselves without side effects. Part one describes different healing methods and therapies such as healing using the subconscious mind, Nutraceutical Therapy, Phytotherapy, Spagyric Medicine, Tibetan Medicine,  Homeopathy, Homotoxicology, Oligotherapy, Low Dose Medicine and Physiological Regulating Medicine. Part two covers a whole range of treatment protocols for a wide variety of health conditions using all the Biotherapy treatments described in part one of the book.
I have named ‘Biotherapy treatments’ all those treatments which are conducive to the restoration or maintainace of health and well being and which are without side effects and I tried to briefly describe them in the following chapters.

Healing using the mind

 

Mind and consciousness

Mind, Pure Being, all encompassing Awareness (or God) is the source of all phenomena and apprehended reality, it is the potentiality of all events, meanings and circumstances and it is beyond all dualistic apprehensions of subjects and objects, time and space.
Mind is the source of all aspects of sentient beings consciousness, the source of the conscious and the subconscious mind as we understand it in Western neuro – science and psychology and the source of all physical and non physical forms. Mind as pure potentiality is beyond time, space and beyond any Laws, but its manifestation is always governed by unchanging Laws.
On the other hand, consciousness or mind (in lower case), as we understand it in Western terminology, is the offspring of Mind, it is the radiation or effulgence of Mind, it is like the reflection appearing in a mirror.

 

The power of concentration and presence

Concentration means ‘to bring to a center’ and is the best of mind’s tools. It can be defined as the undisturbed power of subjective attention over an object of consciousness. Once mastered, concentration is called presence of mind and can also serve the purpose of focusing the the mind for a specific purpose.
In a nutshell, the whole process of concentration or meditation consists in fixing the attention upon something which can be physical, non physical, or one’s own consciousness itself and being able to hold it there without being distracted by wondering thoughts or emotions.

Once mastered in practice sessions, undistracted concentration is then carried into all daytime activities and it is called ‘abiding in the present moment’ or, as in the words of Eckhart Tolle, ‘the power of now’.

 

How to change negative or depressing moods into positive ones

Law of Polarity states that everything has two poles, everything has its pair of opposites and that opposites are identical in nature but different in degree, depending on the rate of vibration, the higher the vibration, the higher the position in the scale.
The positive pole always dominates the negative because of the tendency of nature to go in the direction of the dominant activity of the positive pole.

 

Nutraceutical, phytotherapy and spagyric medicine

Nutraceutical refers to products that range from nutrients, dietary supplements and herbal products, but can include also specific diets and processed foods such as cereals, soups, and beverages.

 

Spagyria

Spagyria or spagyric medicine from the Greek ‘spáein’ to separate or extract and ‘ágeirein’ to combine, is a term first coined by the great physician and alchemist Paracelsus (1493 -1541).
Spagyria maintains that a normal phytotherapic or herbal extract could not be expected to contain all the medicinal properties from the living plant, and so the mineral component (ash) which is result of the ‘calcination’ process, is prepared separately and then added back to potentiate the alcoholic herbal tincture.
Tibetan Medicine

Tibetan Medicine is a very ancient medical system which integrates human physiology and psychology with Buddhist philosophy, astrology and the knowledge of the five elements.
According to Tibetan medicine, the absolute condition of empty luminosity manifests itself in the form of energy into three aspects: body, energy or speech and mind, which are also reflected in the human body in the form of three humors or energies called Wind (tib: rLung), Bile (mKhrispa) and Phlegm (Badken).

 

Homotoxicology

Homotoxicology uses complex or combination homeopathic remedies with a wide range of indications and it is mainly prescribed in order to stimulate the body’s own defense system and to unblock damaged enzyme systems by working on the three main aspects of detoxification, immune modulation and organ support.

 

Physiological Regulating Medicine – PRM (Guna Method)

Physiological Regulating Medicine (PRM) represents an up-to-date integration  of  homeopathy, homotoxicology,  Psycho-
Neuro-Endocrine-Immunology (PNEI) and molecular biology.
PRM innovative approach combines the essential elements of allopathy and homeopathy, integrating the allopathic element related to diagnostic technology, modern physiology, and evidence based homeopathy which provides the therapeutic effects.
PRM can be regarded as a global strategy in which the nervous, endocrine and immune system communicate and cooperate with each other, and where any intervention in one of the systems will have an effect on all of the others.

The clinical therapeutic model of Physiological Regulating Medicine planning includes three phases:

• Reprogramming of  the PNEI system
• Detoxify and drain the organism and the cells
• Symptoms treatment

 

Low Dose Medicine
Low dose medicine is a new therapeutic approach which aims at restoring physiology through communicating or signaling molecules such as cytokines, interleukins, growth factors, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones prepared in low dose-active dilutions (through the homeopathic method of dilution and succussion) and therefore without side effects
Since these molecules have the same physiological concentration (nanograms to picograms) as the molecules present in our organism which control and regulate organic functions under healthy conditions, one could define low dose medicine as ‘regulating medicine’ but also as ‘preventive medicine’ since low dose active preparations have virtually no side effects.

Be Your Own Herbal Expert (Part 8) by Susun S Weed

honey-herbalistBe Your Own Herbal Expert (Part 8)

Healing sweets: herbal honeys, syrups, and cough drops (Part 2)

by Susun S Weed

 

HERBAL SYRUPS

Herbal syrups are sweetened, condensed herbal infusions. Cough drops are concentrated syrups. Alcohol is frequently added to syrups to help prevent fermentation and stabilize the remedy. Cough drops and lozenges, having less water, keep well without the addition of alcohol.
Bitter herbs, especially when effective in a fairly small dose, are often made into syrups: horehound, yellow dock, dandelion, chicory, and motherwort spring to mind in this regard.

Herbs that are especially effective in relieving throat infections and breathing problems are also frequently made into syrups, especially when honey is used as the sweetener: coltsfoot flowers (not leaves), comfrey leaves (not roots), horehound, elder berries, mullein, osha root, pine, sage, and wild cherry bark are favorites for “cough” syrups.

 

USING HERBAL SYRUPS

A dose of most herbal syrup is 1-3 teaspoonfuls, taken as needed. Take a spoonful of bitter syrup just before meals for best results. Take cough syrups as often as every hour.

 


MAKE AN HERBAL SYRUP

To make an herbal syrup you will need the following supplies:
One ounce of dried herb (weight, not volume)
A clean dry quart/liter jar with a tight lid
Boiling water
Measuring cup
A heavy-bottomed medium-sized saucepan
2 cups sugar or 1½ cups honey
A sterilized jar with a small neck and a good lid (a cork stopper is ideal)
A little vodka (optional)
A label and pen

Place the full ounce of dried herb into the quart jar and fill it to the top with boiling water. Cap tightly. After 4-10 hours, decant your infusion, saving the liquid and squeezing the herb to get the last of the goodness out of it.
Measure the amount of liquid you have (usually about 3½ cups). Pour this into the saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat until the infusion is just barely simmering. Continue to simmer until the liquid is reduced by half (pour it out of the pan and into the measuring cup now and then to check). This step can take several hours; the decoction is not spoiled if it is reduced to less than half, but it is ruined if it boils hard or if it burns. Keep a close eye on it.

When you have reduced the infusion to less then two cups, add the sugar or honey (or sweetener of your choice) and bring to a rolling boil. Pour, boiling hot, into your jar. (Sterilize the jar by boiling it in plain water for a few minutes just before filling it.) If desired, add some vodka to preserve the syrup.
Allow the bottle of syrup to come to room temperature. Label it. Store it in the refrigerator or keep it in a cool place.

 

MAKE HERBAL COUGH DROPS

You must make a syrup with sugar, not honey to make cough drops, but you can use raw sugar or brown sugar instead of white sugar and it will work just as well.
Instead of pouring your boiling hot syrup into a bottle, keep boiling it. Every minute or so, drop a bit into cold water. When it forms a hard ball in the cold water, immediately turn off the fire. Pour your very thick syrup into a buttered flat dish. Cool, then cut into small squares.
A dusting of powdered sugar will keep them from sticking. Store airtight in a cool place.

 

MAKE THROAT-SOOTHING LOZENGES

Put an ounce of marshmallow root powder or slippery elm bark powder in a bowl.
Slowly add honey, stirring constantly, until you have a thick paste
Roll your slippery elm paste into small balls
Roll the balls in more slippery elm powder
Store in a tightly-closed tin. These will keep for up to ten years.

 

PLANTS THAT I USE TO MAKE HERBAL SYRUPS

Comfrey leaves (Symphytum uplandica x)
Chicory roots (Cichorium intybus)
Dandelion flowers or roots (Taraxacum off.)
Elder berries (Sambucus canadensis)
Horehound leaves and stems (Marrubium vulgare)
Motherwort leaves (Leonurus cardiaca) pick before flowering
Plantain leaves or roots (Plantago majus)
Osha root (Ligusticum porterii)
Pine needles or inner bark (Pinus)
Sage (Salvia off.)
Wild cherry bark (Prunus serotina)
Yellow dock roots (Rumex crispus)

 

EXPERIMENT NUMBER ONE



Make a simple syrup, using only one plant. Make it once with honey, once with white sugar, and once with a sweetener of your choice, such as barley malt, agave syrup, molasses, sorghum syrup, or maple syrup. (See list for suggestions of plants to use.)

 

EXPERIMENT NUMBER TWO

Make a syrup with three or more plants. Choose plants that are local to your area, or ones that you can most easily buy.

 

EXPERIMENT NUMBER THREE

Make three or more simple herbal honeys using different parts of plants, such as flowers, leaves, roots, or seeds. (See list for suggestions of plants to use.)

 

EXPERIMENT NUMBER FOUR

Make an herbal honey with a plant rich in essential oils (such as sage, rosemary, lavender, or mint). Try it as a wound treatment. Try it on minor burns. Try it as a facial masque. Record your observations.

 

EXPERIMENT NUMBER FIVE

Make one or more of the recipes in this lesson.

 

FURTHER STUDY

1. Make a yellow dock iron tonic syrup following the recipe in my book Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year.
2. Make “Peel Power” following the recipe in my book New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way.

 

ADVANCED WORK

• Compare the effects of honey from the supermarket, organic honey, raw honey, and herbal honey by using each one to treat the same problems and carefully recording your observations.

Organic Is Better. Really.

organicOrganic Is Better. Really.

Are organic foods healthier? Worth the extra expense?

The scientific debate has raged on for years.

Now, a new report says yes—especially if you believe toxic chemicals are bad for your health.

Two years ago conventional media used a meta-analysis by Stanford University to cast doubt on the value of an organic diet. This despite the fact that the analysis—which looked at 240 studies comparing organically and conventionally grown food—found that organic foods are less contaminated with agricultural chemicals.
In an effort to further clarify the 2012 findings, a group of European scientists recently evaluated an even greater number of studies, 343 in all, published over the last several decades.

 
Here’s what they found. Not only do organic foods have more nutrients, including cancer-fighting antioxidants, but they also contain far fewer pesticide residues. This is a no-brainer given that monoculture chemical and GMO farmers kill the soil with toxic chemicals and climate-destabilizing nitrate fertilizer—while organic farmers feed the soil with compost, nurturing the soil food web.
But the key nutritional difference between conventional and organics? Anywhere from 18 to 69 percent more antioxidants.

Read full article here: www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_30585.cfm

Reprinted with permission by the Organic Consumers Association.

The All-Day Energy Diet by Yuri Elkaim

All-day-energy-dietThe All-Day Energy Diet

by Yuri Elkaim

Yuri Elkaim discusses many principles to achieving optimal health and energy in his upcoming book The All-Day Energy Diet
 
Adrenal Depleters

Whether you’re worrying about paying your bills, consistently engaging in insanely intense workouts, drinking coffee or energy drinks, or throwing back a few sugary treats every day, you’re “stressing” your adrenals. Because of that, they respond the same way they did 10,000 years ago when our ancestors were hunting that bison. One of the challenges today is that while the human body evolves linearly, technology increases exponentially (according to Moore’s law). Thus, we have the same biology we did hundreds of thousands of years ago, which isn’t necessarily best suited for handling the increasingly rapid, nonstop stresses of the modern world.
So, collectively, here’s how the aforementioned stressors negatively affect your adrenals (and by default drain your energy over time):

  • Excessive stimulation and stress cause your adrenals to release adrenaline and cortisol—two catabolic hormones, which break down your energy reserves for immediate use. Remember, your body thinks it’s in a state where it needs to fight or flee—so it needs that readily available energy. Cortisol, when chronically elevated in your bloodstream, is a detrimental hormone, leading to quick glycogen (stored carbohydrates) depletion, a rise in blood sugar, and eventually weight gain (especially abdominal weight gain). And even when it’s less present (adrenal fatigue), epinephrine picks up the slack, yielding the same problems.
  • Adrenaline (epinephrine) has similar energy-depleting effects. Initially, however, it gives you that feeling often described as a “natural high” or “caffeine rush,” because it temporarily increases your heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and carbohydrate breakdown into blood sugar. Within a few minutes you feel alive and ready to take on the world. But that quick surge in energy is soon followed by a debilitating crash in which your body does its best to recover from the stressful situation, whether it’s your morning coffee or a near fender bender on your way to work. Can you remember the last time you felt that crash? It probably wasn’t too long ago.
  • With respect to hormones, balance is key. We don’t want excessively elevated levels (that is, acute stress), nor do we want excessively low levels (chronic stress, leading to adrenal fatigue).
  • If you ever feel exhausted after an argument, a bout of physical exercise, a stressful day at work, or a few hours after your morning coffee, then you can be sure that your adrenals are crying out for help. Everything you feel is a message from your body. In this case, your adrenals are asking for some sorely needed rest and relaxation. They don’t want more stimulation, and they certainly don’t want to keep up with your intense workout regimen. They simply can’t.

 
How to Test Your Adrenals

The gold standard for testing the health of your adrenals is the adrenal salivary hormone test. This test requires four saliva samples to be taken at specific times throughout the day (upon waking, lunch, midafternoon, and before bed) to evaluate your total cortisol level, cortisol (or circadian) rhythm, and DHEA (a precursor to most sex hormones). This is because normal cortisol rhythm during the day features high cortisol upon waking and lowering levels through the rest of the day until bed. Basically, cortisol rises and falls with the sun and is inversely related to the sleep-inducing neurotransmitter melatonin (which does the opposite).

You can get this test done for about $200 at a naturopathic clinic near you or even online through Metametrix Clinical Laboratory (metametrix.com) and Diagnos-Techs (diagnostechs.com).

Aside from lab testing, there are two very simple adrenal tests you can do at no cost right in the comfort of your own home. These will give you a good indication of whether or not your adrenals are working properly.

The first test is called the pupillary light reflex test. Here’s how to do it:
Stand in front of a mirror in a dark room.
Take a flashlight and shine the light into one eye at a 45-degree angle from the side.
Watch your pupil for 30 seconds.

When in the dark, your pupil should naturally dilate to allow more light to enter. When you shine the light, it should instinctively contract. The duration of the contraction can give you an indication of adrenal function.

 

Here’s what your findings could represent:

  • Pupil Constriction
  • Possible Meaning
  • Stays constricted for more than 20 seconds
  • Healthy adrenal function
  • Pulses after ten seconds
  • Decent adrenal function
  • Pulses after five seconds
  • Poor adrenal function
  • Immediate pulsation and dilation
  • Adrenal exhaustion

If negative responses are observed, additional testing is warranted, and I recommend you perform the orthostatic hypotension test. This test does require a blood-pressure cuff, which might not be accessible to you. Nonetheless, I’ll share a shortcut with you at the end. Here’s how to do it:

Lie down and relax for five minutes, then record your blood pressure. Make note of the systolic pressure (the top number).
Stand up and take your blood pressure again.

If your systolic pressure remains the same or if it decreases, that usually implies that your adrenals aren’t functioning properly. When you stand, epinephrine should be secreted to increase your blood pressure. This helps prevent gravity from pulling blood away from your brain. If your blood pressure drops upon standing, this indicates that epinephrine isn’t present to do its job, and that’s because your adrenal glands are too tired to work properly. Make sense?

Now for that shortcut I promised you, as you probably don’t have a blood-pressure cuff at home. (Don’t worry; I don’t either.) The easiest way to perform this test is to simply go from lying down to standing and notice how you feel. Do you feel light-headed or dizzy? Maybe even like blacking out? If so, these are indicators that your blood pressure has dropped.

Yuri Elkaim is a registered holistic nutritionist and renowned fitness expert. For more than 13 years, his honest and inspiring messages have helped more than 500,000 people worldwide enjoy more energy, lose weight, get in great shape, eat healthier, and have a much better understanding of their health. A former pro soccer player who later acted as the strength and conditioning and nutrition coach for seven seasons at the University of Toronto, Yuri is now on a mission to transform the lives of more than 10 million people by 2018 and would love for you to be one of them. Learn more about his upcoming book at www.hayhouse.com

5 Ways to Give off a Positive Vibe at Home, Work and Play By Sherry Blair

think-positive5 Ways to Give off a Positive Vibe at Home, Work and Play

By Sherry Blair

Have you ever been around someone that gives off a negative vibe? Oftentimes being around someone who is negative can make us feel negative as well. Our demeanor, attitude and mood affect not only us, but others around us. Those who give off a positive vibe often times are happier, more connected with others, and have a brighter outlook on life. A general rule of thumb for being happy in life is to surround yourself with positive people. Positive people make you feel more positive! Sherry Blair, CEO of ISIS Innovative Specialists Inspirational Services, shares her thoughts on bringing positivity to your life.

“Surrounding yourself with negative people is only going to make you negative. I truly believe that happy people are friends with other happy people! Think about what would happen if you got a promotion; it wouldn’t be fun to share your success with a negative friend. They would end up taking away your happy! Positive people will always cheer for your successes,” says Sherry Blair.

If you feel like you can sometimes give off a negative vibe, it’s time to turn that frown upside down! Here are five ways to give off a positive vibe at home, work and play:

 

1) Smile

If you aren’t smiling right now, start.  Too often people are not smiling. The more you smile, the happier you will feel. Why? Because! Everyone wants to be around the girl or guy who is always smiling and happy; it’s infectious. Starting today, smile at the cashier that rings you out, smile when meeting someone new, and smile just because!

 

2) Laugh

Smiling and laughing go hand and hand. The more you laugh, even if forced, the happier you will feel. If you laugh enough, eventually it stops feeling forced and starts being genuine. If you find something even remotely funny, laugh. You’ll find that laughing feels good!

 

3) Choose Positivity

If you have a clear intention to increase your positivity, then tweaking just a few minor communications each day can have a major impact with your friends, co-workers and family members.

 

4) Celebrate others

Have you ever had a friend that loves to tell you about all the great things going on in her life, but never wants to listen to all the things in yours? These kinds of friends are not positive ones to be around! Since you don’t like when someone does that to you, don’t do it to others! When a friend shares an accomplishment, celebrate it! Your friends will start to notice that you are always so positive about the ups and downs in their lives and will appreciate you for it.

 

5) Say more positive words

What we say plays a big role in how we are perceived. If you are always saying “no” or, “that doesn’t work”, you aren’t going to come off as being a warm, positive person. Work on saying more positive words in your day-to-day life. Phrases like “thank you”, “I love you”, and “I agree” are all positive ways to communicate.

Note to the media: Sherry Blair is a popular media expert and can speak on any topics related to positive living and mental health. To schedule an interview with Sherry Blair, contact Tasha Mayberry, Director Public Relations at pr@isisnj.us or call 207.317.6099.

 

About Sherry Blair
 
Sherry Blair is the CEO of ISIS Innovative Specialists Inspirational Services, where she inspires and motivates others by applying and encouraging Positive Psychology. A Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Board Certified Professional Counselor and Diplomate Professional Coach, Sherry teaches at University of California’s Graduate School of Social Work and is the author of several books. The positivity coach teaches others to speak from their hearts in synergy with their minds to achieve results and resolve conflict. Visit Sherry online at www.isisnj.us.
 

Creatively Fun Lifestyle Tips for a Healthy Family by Karen Ranzi, M.A.

creating-healthy-childrenCreatively Fun Lifestyle Tips for a Healthy Family

by Karen Ranzi, M.A.

Author: Creating Healthy Children through Attachment Parenting and Raw Foods

Some of the many advantages your children will experience after increasing the amount of fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables in their diets: absence of eye, ear, nose, throat or sinus infections, increased energy and attention spans, enhanced ability to process information, a heightened sense of ease, comfort, harmony, and perception, less hyperactivity, strengthened immune systems, enhanced athletic capability, increased brainpower and intellectual curiosity, emotional poise and a greater range of expressivity. I would like to share with you some of the many creative tips I learned along the nurturing parenting path to enhance a fun, healthy lifestyle that would help children understand the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables:

General Tips to Remember

1. Try different textures.
For example, a child may not like green leafy vegetables in a salad but may enjoy them in green smoothies, juices, soups or dips.

2. Keep fruits and vegetables around the kitchen in pretty baskets and brightly colored bowls.
Children will find the varied colors of the foods in their everyday environment attractive.

3. Name the foods you make with lively or catchy titles!
My kids created their own recipes, even from the time they were very little, and then gave names to the recipes. For example: BAT (Banana, Apple and a scoop of Tahini) – a cereal which worked very well at replacing the processed packaged cereals. BAT became a family favorite.

4. Kids love using equipment
A saladacco for making veggie pasta; a snow cone maker for making ices from fresh fruit juice for a special birthday party treat; a small juicer (such as The Healthy Juicer); a mini food processor; the Champion Juicer for making all sorts of recipes, especially banana ice cream; and a dehydrator for making crackers, veggie burgers and chips heated at low temperatures to preserve the enzymes of the food.

5. Play “Health Food Restaurant”
Let your kids be the Chefs! If you set the example, your children will love setting up counters, and preparing smoothies, juices, fruit or veggie platters, guacamole, cole slaw and beautiful salads. My children often used a doorway as their ideal place to set up their restaurant. The ironing board or a small table was the counter. Even when we traveled, we bought food for them to prepare meals for us in our hotel room, and my husband and I would be the customers, paying them for our meals.

6. Kids love dips!
I observe so many children eating their green leaves (such as kale, Romaine lettuce and spinach) and other veggies while delighting in fresh home-made dips made from fruits, vegetables and herbs such as basil, cilantro or dill, and nuts or seeds. Below are two of the many dips my children have enjoyed:

Creamy Cucumber Dill Dip

• 1 cup chopped cucumber
• 3 T soaked pine nuts (soaked a few hours)
• Juice of 1 lemon
• 2 soaked pitted dates
• cup fresh chopped dill
• 1 to 2 stalks celery

Blend all ingredients until smooth and creamy. Add more dill if desired.

 

No Bean Hummos

• 2 cups peeled chopped zucchini
• cup hulled sesame seeds
• Juice of 1 lemon
• 1 tsp. paprika
• 1 teaspoon sea salt (optional)

Blend sesame seeds until ground using a high power blender such as the Vita-Mix or a food processor. Add remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy.

 

7. Kids adore attractive food designs that display a picture
For example, slicing a half inch thick pineapple circle can be used to make the “sun” and a bowl of orange sections makes the sun’s rays. I have used a heart-shaped stainless steel cake pan to prepare special raw treats for Valentine’s Day. I purchased different ridge-shaped cutters to make decorative trims on cucumbers, cantaloupes, peppers and carrots. Children like interesting and fun designs in food, so why not use these tools for making fun shapes with raw foods? It is also easy to find many different cookie cutter shapes and holiday designs for making cookies, cakes and other treats.

8. Use of puppetry with young children is an excellent way to introduce them to fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables and to encourage discussion of healthful living topics in a non-threatening play situation.

9. Traveling with your children provides an excellent learning experience and creates family bonding time.
We were always able to find fruits and vegetables during our travels to Central and South America and Europe. It was exciting to look up and identify specific fruits or vegetables in the book Fruits and Vegetables of the World by Michel Viard and then locate them in the market at each new destination.

 
Karen Ranzi is the author of Creating Healthy Children: Through Attachment Parenting and Raw Foods, available at www.superhealthychildren.com, Barnes & Noble, and Whole Foods Markets. You can e-mail Karen at karen@superhealthychildren.com. Copyright 2010 Karen Ranzi

Toxic world, toxic people by Anna Victoria Rodgers

toxic worldToxic world, toxic people

by Anna Victoria Rodgers

Book Excerpt

 

What IS Your Purpose?

I’m sure you have already asked yourself, ‘What is the meaning of life?‘ or ‘Why am I here?‘ I know I certainly asked myself these questions time and time again for many years, and, as I was never able to answer them properly, I was left feeling very confused and deeply unhappy. I just didn’t understand what my life was supposed to be about. It was depressing to feel useless and not able to do anything of benefit.

Finding your spirit also means connecting with what is called your ‘intuition’ – you know, when you have to make a decision and you can sense the right answer? But for many, they get the wrong answer because they haven’t learnt to really listen to their inner selves. Finding your spirit also means getting in touch with your soul.

One way of connecting to your spirit is through meditation. Meditation has become a very accepted form of stress relief these days with many doctors now recommending it. Through the act of sitting, being still and deep breathing, within seconds the body and mind is able to achieve a very relaxed state. Hypnotherapists also use this technique to get into our subconscious minds where they can help us to overcome fears and anxieties, unlock past memories, and actually ‘reprogram’ the mind. It’s interesting to know that the word ‘inspiration’ is not only used to define breathing, but that we use it to describe what drives and motivates us.

So to become inspired, we must perform inspiration through deep breathing. Yoga and getting close to Nature, are forms of meditation too. Try to sit still for at least 10 minutes every day; don’t try and shut your thoughts off, but instead pay attention to them and see what keeps coming up. The more you do this, the more you will find yourself less stressed and will often also be able to deal with tough situations much better. Meditation allows you to be still with your inner thoughts and can bring a profound sense of peace. By practicing meditation, you can really get to know yourself, through seeing how you ‘talk’ to yourself, what memories come up and what you feel you need to improve.

If you have trouble meditating, like so many do, myself included, the following tips, inspired by the book Falling into Easy by Dee Willock may help.

Sitting in the right position

This is usually cross-legged or sitting on a chair. Lying down may mean that you fall asleep, so sometimes being a bit uncomfortable will help you to meditate. When I try, I find myself getting super-itchy and cannot sit still! This is common too and only goes away the more you practice.

Making a space just for meditating

If you want to get serious about your practice, then it may be a good idea to create a little area just for this. You can get comfy cushions, or a nice chair, and surround it with incense (the non-toxic kind of course!), aromatherapy, music, candles and crystals. Buddhists will have status of Buddha to look at and may also use beads to hold. You can make it whatever way you like, but just be sure that it’s an area that relaxes you.

Finding the time

Like most things, the more regular we are, the better and easier it becomes. Meditating is exactly the type of thing that responds to regular sessions. Some say it’s best first thing in the morning and those that are serious may get up before the crack of dawn to meditate as the sun goes up. If you can’t manage sessions every day, try to do it a few times a week, even if it’s just for 10 minutes.

Breathing correctly

Breathing is so powerful. It can relieve us of tension and pain and get us quickly relaxed in no time at all. Women who do hypnobirthing say that they had a pain-free birth purely down to the way that they breathed, as well as visualizing and practicing the technique. I didn’t exactly have a pain-free birth but I did manage to have it without drugs and I do credit the deep breathing with this. When meditating, breathing deeply is very important. There are many types of ways to breathe during meditation; some prefer breathing slowly, while others will do more vigorous types of breath work such as pranayama. If you want to find an example, YouTube have plenty of videos on this subject.

Letting your thoughts think

It used to be that we were told we must ‘empty our minds’ to meditate properly, but now so many are saying: No, that’s not always right. You can let your thoughts enter you mind; take notice of them and then let them go. You can learn a lot about yourself when certain words or memories pop up in your mind; some will be a bit silly or odd and others may be quite profound.

 

After leading a very unwell life, Anna Rodgers healed herself naturally after discovering she was very ill due to toxic exposure from a toxic chemical when young. She started her blog Miss Eco Glam in 2009 where she has gained a following for being ethical and glamourous at the same time, dispelling the myth that only hippies can be green.
 
Anna also contributes travel articles to Get Fresh and Yoga Magazine, as well as regularly writes articles for her website. Anna has also written the book, Simply The Best – 95 Living Food Recipes by 20 of The Worlds Most Talented Raw Chefs and is co-writing a recipe and health book with Karen Maidment, holistic nutritionist, later in the year. She is also bringing out a health and wellbeing book for teenagers in 2015. Anna is an ex-model and over the last few years was the face of St Erasmus Ethical Jewellery for 3 seasons. She lives in East Sussex, UK.
 
Toxic World, Toxic People is published by Soul Rocks Books June. ISBN: 978-1-78099-471-0 (Paperback) £21.99 $37.95

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